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Customer Wins Suit Against Domino’s Over Missing Pizza

Customer Wins Suit Against Domino’s Over Missing Pizza


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A man’s pizza never arrived, and now the chain owes him $1,200

Wikimedia/Maksym Kozlenko

An Australian man was awarded $1,200 after he sued Domino's for a pizza that never showed up.

A missing pizza is an annoyance, but not one so big that most people would be willing to go to court over it. One Australian man did, though, and this week he was awarded $1,200 after suing Domino’s for a pizza that never showed up.

According to 9 News, last year personal injury and worker’s compensation lawyer Tim Driscoll ordered three pizzas, two garlic breads, and two Cokes from Domino’s, but they never arrived. Driscoll reportedly called the restaurant after an hour, and the manager apologized for the delay and offered him a refund. Driscoll was reportedly OK with just getting a refund for his missing order, for which he had paid $37.35. But then the refund never came, either.

Driscoll said that after a year of trying to get his refund, he finally got annoyed enough to take the issue to court. At first he was looking for $9,000 compensation to teach the chain a lesson after he was allegedly “fobbed off” for a year, but yesterday Driscoll went before a judge to make his case. Domino’s reportedly did not show up, and the judge ruled that the chain had to pay $1,203 to cover both the $37.35 order, and Driscoll’s legal fees.

Domino’s is reportedly considering appealing the decision.


Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, [1] also known as the McDonald's coffee case and the hot coffee lawsuit, was a 1994 product liability lawsuit that became a flashpoint in the debate in the United States over tort reform. Although a New Mexico civil jury awarded $2.86 million to plaintiff Stella Liebeck, a 79-year-old woman who suffered third-degree burns in her pelvic region when she accidentally spilled hot coffee in her lap after purchasing it from a McDonald's restaurant. Ultimately, Liebeck was only awarded $640,000. Liebeck was hospitalized for eight days while she underwent skin grafting, followed by two years of medical treatment.

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants
Full case nameStella Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, P.T.S., Inc. and McDonald's International, Inc.
DecidedAugust 18, 1994
Citation(s)1994 Extra LEXIS 23 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994), 1995 WL 360309 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994),
Court membership
Judge(s) sittingRobert H. Scott

Liebeck's attorneys argued that, at 180–190 °F (82–88 °C), McDonald's coffee was defective, claiming it was too hot and more likely to cause serious injury than coffee served at any other establishment. McDonald's had refused several prior opportunities to settle for less than what the jury ultimately awarded. [2] The jury damages included $160,000 [ citation needed ] to cover medical expenses and compensatory damages and $2.7 million in punitive damages. The trial judge reduced the final verdict to $640,000, and the parties settled for a confidential amount before an appeal was decided. [3]

The case was said by some to be an example of frivolous litigation [4] ABC News called the case "the poster child of excessive lawsuits", [5] while the legal scholar Jonathan Turley argued that the claim was "a meaningful and worthy lawsuit". [6] Ex-attorney Susan Saladoff sees the manner in which the case was portrayed in the media as purposeful misrepresentation due to political and corporate influence. [7] In June 2011, HBO premiered Hot Coffee, a documentary that discussed in depth how the Liebeck case has centered in debates on tort reform. [8] [9] [10]


Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, [1] also known as the McDonald's coffee case and the hot coffee lawsuit, was a 1994 product liability lawsuit that became a flashpoint in the debate in the United States over tort reform. Although a New Mexico civil jury awarded $2.86 million to plaintiff Stella Liebeck, a 79-year-old woman who suffered third-degree burns in her pelvic region when she accidentally spilled hot coffee in her lap after purchasing it from a McDonald's restaurant. Ultimately, Liebeck was only awarded $640,000. Liebeck was hospitalized for eight days while she underwent skin grafting, followed by two years of medical treatment.

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants
Full case nameStella Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, P.T.S., Inc. and McDonald's International, Inc.
DecidedAugust 18, 1994
Citation(s)1994 Extra LEXIS 23 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994), 1995 WL 360309 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994),
Court membership
Judge(s) sittingRobert H. Scott

Liebeck's attorneys argued that, at 180–190 °F (82–88 °C), McDonald's coffee was defective, claiming it was too hot and more likely to cause serious injury than coffee served at any other establishment. McDonald's had refused several prior opportunities to settle for less than what the jury ultimately awarded. [2] The jury damages included $160,000 [ citation needed ] to cover medical expenses and compensatory damages and $2.7 million in punitive damages. The trial judge reduced the final verdict to $640,000, and the parties settled for a confidential amount before an appeal was decided. [3]

The case was said by some to be an example of frivolous litigation [4] ABC News called the case "the poster child of excessive lawsuits", [5] while the legal scholar Jonathan Turley argued that the claim was "a meaningful and worthy lawsuit". [6] Ex-attorney Susan Saladoff sees the manner in which the case was portrayed in the media as purposeful misrepresentation due to political and corporate influence. [7] In June 2011, HBO premiered Hot Coffee, a documentary that discussed in depth how the Liebeck case has centered in debates on tort reform. [8] [9] [10]


Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, [1] also known as the McDonald's coffee case and the hot coffee lawsuit, was a 1994 product liability lawsuit that became a flashpoint in the debate in the United States over tort reform. Although a New Mexico civil jury awarded $2.86 million to plaintiff Stella Liebeck, a 79-year-old woman who suffered third-degree burns in her pelvic region when she accidentally spilled hot coffee in her lap after purchasing it from a McDonald's restaurant. Ultimately, Liebeck was only awarded $640,000. Liebeck was hospitalized for eight days while she underwent skin grafting, followed by two years of medical treatment.

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants
Full case nameStella Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, P.T.S., Inc. and McDonald's International, Inc.
DecidedAugust 18, 1994
Citation(s)1994 Extra LEXIS 23 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994), 1995 WL 360309 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994),
Court membership
Judge(s) sittingRobert H. Scott

Liebeck's attorneys argued that, at 180–190 °F (82–88 °C), McDonald's coffee was defective, claiming it was too hot and more likely to cause serious injury than coffee served at any other establishment. McDonald's had refused several prior opportunities to settle for less than what the jury ultimately awarded. [2] The jury damages included $160,000 [ citation needed ] to cover medical expenses and compensatory damages and $2.7 million in punitive damages. The trial judge reduced the final verdict to $640,000, and the parties settled for a confidential amount before an appeal was decided. [3]

The case was said by some to be an example of frivolous litigation [4] ABC News called the case "the poster child of excessive lawsuits", [5] while the legal scholar Jonathan Turley argued that the claim was "a meaningful and worthy lawsuit". [6] Ex-attorney Susan Saladoff sees the manner in which the case was portrayed in the media as purposeful misrepresentation due to political and corporate influence. [7] In June 2011, HBO premiered Hot Coffee, a documentary that discussed in depth how the Liebeck case has centered in debates on tort reform. [8] [9] [10]


Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, [1] also known as the McDonald's coffee case and the hot coffee lawsuit, was a 1994 product liability lawsuit that became a flashpoint in the debate in the United States over tort reform. Although a New Mexico civil jury awarded $2.86 million to plaintiff Stella Liebeck, a 79-year-old woman who suffered third-degree burns in her pelvic region when she accidentally spilled hot coffee in her lap after purchasing it from a McDonald's restaurant. Ultimately, Liebeck was only awarded $640,000. Liebeck was hospitalized for eight days while she underwent skin grafting, followed by two years of medical treatment.

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants
Full case nameStella Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, P.T.S., Inc. and McDonald's International, Inc.
DecidedAugust 18, 1994
Citation(s)1994 Extra LEXIS 23 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994), 1995 WL 360309 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994),
Court membership
Judge(s) sittingRobert H. Scott

Liebeck's attorneys argued that, at 180–190 °F (82–88 °C), McDonald's coffee was defective, claiming it was too hot and more likely to cause serious injury than coffee served at any other establishment. McDonald's had refused several prior opportunities to settle for less than what the jury ultimately awarded. [2] The jury damages included $160,000 [ citation needed ] to cover medical expenses and compensatory damages and $2.7 million in punitive damages. The trial judge reduced the final verdict to $640,000, and the parties settled for a confidential amount before an appeal was decided. [3]

The case was said by some to be an example of frivolous litigation [4] ABC News called the case "the poster child of excessive lawsuits", [5] while the legal scholar Jonathan Turley argued that the claim was "a meaningful and worthy lawsuit". [6] Ex-attorney Susan Saladoff sees the manner in which the case was portrayed in the media as purposeful misrepresentation due to political and corporate influence. [7] In June 2011, HBO premiered Hot Coffee, a documentary that discussed in depth how the Liebeck case has centered in debates on tort reform. [8] [9] [10]


Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, [1] also known as the McDonald's coffee case and the hot coffee lawsuit, was a 1994 product liability lawsuit that became a flashpoint in the debate in the United States over tort reform. Although a New Mexico civil jury awarded $2.86 million to plaintiff Stella Liebeck, a 79-year-old woman who suffered third-degree burns in her pelvic region when she accidentally spilled hot coffee in her lap after purchasing it from a McDonald's restaurant. Ultimately, Liebeck was only awarded $640,000. Liebeck was hospitalized for eight days while she underwent skin grafting, followed by two years of medical treatment.

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants
Full case nameStella Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, P.T.S., Inc. and McDonald's International, Inc.
DecidedAugust 18, 1994
Citation(s)1994 Extra LEXIS 23 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994), 1995 WL 360309 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994),
Court membership
Judge(s) sittingRobert H. Scott

Liebeck's attorneys argued that, at 180–190 °F (82–88 °C), McDonald's coffee was defective, claiming it was too hot and more likely to cause serious injury than coffee served at any other establishment. McDonald's had refused several prior opportunities to settle for less than what the jury ultimately awarded. [2] The jury damages included $160,000 [ citation needed ] to cover medical expenses and compensatory damages and $2.7 million in punitive damages. The trial judge reduced the final verdict to $640,000, and the parties settled for a confidential amount before an appeal was decided. [3]

The case was said by some to be an example of frivolous litigation [4] ABC News called the case "the poster child of excessive lawsuits", [5] while the legal scholar Jonathan Turley argued that the claim was "a meaningful and worthy lawsuit". [6] Ex-attorney Susan Saladoff sees the manner in which the case was portrayed in the media as purposeful misrepresentation due to political and corporate influence. [7] In June 2011, HBO premiered Hot Coffee, a documentary that discussed in depth how the Liebeck case has centered in debates on tort reform. [8] [9] [10]


Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, [1] also known as the McDonald's coffee case and the hot coffee lawsuit, was a 1994 product liability lawsuit that became a flashpoint in the debate in the United States over tort reform. Although a New Mexico civil jury awarded $2.86 million to plaintiff Stella Liebeck, a 79-year-old woman who suffered third-degree burns in her pelvic region when she accidentally spilled hot coffee in her lap after purchasing it from a McDonald's restaurant. Ultimately, Liebeck was only awarded $640,000. Liebeck was hospitalized for eight days while she underwent skin grafting, followed by two years of medical treatment.

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants
Full case nameStella Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, P.T.S., Inc. and McDonald's International, Inc.
DecidedAugust 18, 1994
Citation(s)1994 Extra LEXIS 23 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994), 1995 WL 360309 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994),
Court membership
Judge(s) sittingRobert H. Scott

Liebeck's attorneys argued that, at 180–190 °F (82–88 °C), McDonald's coffee was defective, claiming it was too hot and more likely to cause serious injury than coffee served at any other establishment. McDonald's had refused several prior opportunities to settle for less than what the jury ultimately awarded. [2] The jury damages included $160,000 [ citation needed ] to cover medical expenses and compensatory damages and $2.7 million in punitive damages. The trial judge reduced the final verdict to $640,000, and the parties settled for a confidential amount before an appeal was decided. [3]

The case was said by some to be an example of frivolous litigation [4] ABC News called the case "the poster child of excessive lawsuits", [5] while the legal scholar Jonathan Turley argued that the claim was "a meaningful and worthy lawsuit". [6] Ex-attorney Susan Saladoff sees the manner in which the case was portrayed in the media as purposeful misrepresentation due to political and corporate influence. [7] In June 2011, HBO premiered Hot Coffee, a documentary that discussed in depth how the Liebeck case has centered in debates on tort reform. [8] [9] [10]


Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, [1] also known as the McDonald's coffee case and the hot coffee lawsuit, was a 1994 product liability lawsuit that became a flashpoint in the debate in the United States over tort reform. Although a New Mexico civil jury awarded $2.86 million to plaintiff Stella Liebeck, a 79-year-old woman who suffered third-degree burns in her pelvic region when she accidentally spilled hot coffee in her lap after purchasing it from a McDonald's restaurant. Ultimately, Liebeck was only awarded $640,000. Liebeck was hospitalized for eight days while she underwent skin grafting, followed by two years of medical treatment.

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants
Full case nameStella Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, P.T.S., Inc. and McDonald's International, Inc.
DecidedAugust 18, 1994
Citation(s)1994 Extra LEXIS 23 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994), 1995 WL 360309 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994),
Court membership
Judge(s) sittingRobert H. Scott

Liebeck's attorneys argued that, at 180–190 °F (82–88 °C), McDonald's coffee was defective, claiming it was too hot and more likely to cause serious injury than coffee served at any other establishment. McDonald's had refused several prior opportunities to settle for less than what the jury ultimately awarded. [2] The jury damages included $160,000 [ citation needed ] to cover medical expenses and compensatory damages and $2.7 million in punitive damages. The trial judge reduced the final verdict to $640,000, and the parties settled for a confidential amount before an appeal was decided. [3]

The case was said by some to be an example of frivolous litigation [4] ABC News called the case "the poster child of excessive lawsuits", [5] while the legal scholar Jonathan Turley argued that the claim was "a meaningful and worthy lawsuit". [6] Ex-attorney Susan Saladoff sees the manner in which the case was portrayed in the media as purposeful misrepresentation due to political and corporate influence. [7] In June 2011, HBO premiered Hot Coffee, a documentary that discussed in depth how the Liebeck case has centered in debates on tort reform. [8] [9] [10]


Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, [1] also known as the McDonald's coffee case and the hot coffee lawsuit, was a 1994 product liability lawsuit that became a flashpoint in the debate in the United States over tort reform. Although a New Mexico civil jury awarded $2.86 million to plaintiff Stella Liebeck, a 79-year-old woman who suffered third-degree burns in her pelvic region when she accidentally spilled hot coffee in her lap after purchasing it from a McDonald's restaurant. Ultimately, Liebeck was only awarded $640,000. Liebeck was hospitalized for eight days while she underwent skin grafting, followed by two years of medical treatment.

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants
Full case nameStella Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, P.T.S., Inc. and McDonald's International, Inc.
DecidedAugust 18, 1994
Citation(s)1994 Extra LEXIS 23 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994), 1995 WL 360309 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994),
Court membership
Judge(s) sittingRobert H. Scott

Liebeck's attorneys argued that, at 180–190 °F (82–88 °C), McDonald's coffee was defective, claiming it was too hot and more likely to cause serious injury than coffee served at any other establishment. McDonald's had refused several prior opportunities to settle for less than what the jury ultimately awarded. [2] The jury damages included $160,000 [ citation needed ] to cover medical expenses and compensatory damages and $2.7 million in punitive damages. The trial judge reduced the final verdict to $640,000, and the parties settled for a confidential amount before an appeal was decided. [3]

The case was said by some to be an example of frivolous litigation [4] ABC News called the case "the poster child of excessive lawsuits", [5] while the legal scholar Jonathan Turley argued that the claim was "a meaningful and worthy lawsuit". [6] Ex-attorney Susan Saladoff sees the manner in which the case was portrayed in the media as purposeful misrepresentation due to political and corporate influence. [7] In June 2011, HBO premiered Hot Coffee, a documentary that discussed in depth how the Liebeck case has centered in debates on tort reform. [8] [9] [10]


Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, [1] also known as the McDonald's coffee case and the hot coffee lawsuit, was a 1994 product liability lawsuit that became a flashpoint in the debate in the United States over tort reform. Although a New Mexico civil jury awarded $2.86 million to plaintiff Stella Liebeck, a 79-year-old woman who suffered third-degree burns in her pelvic region when she accidentally spilled hot coffee in her lap after purchasing it from a McDonald's restaurant. Ultimately, Liebeck was only awarded $640,000. Liebeck was hospitalized for eight days while she underwent skin grafting, followed by two years of medical treatment.

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants
Full case nameStella Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, P.T.S., Inc. and McDonald's International, Inc.
DecidedAugust 18, 1994
Citation(s)1994 Extra LEXIS 23 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994), 1995 WL 360309 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994),
Court membership
Judge(s) sittingRobert H. Scott

Liebeck's attorneys argued that, at 180–190 °F (82–88 °C), McDonald's coffee was defective, claiming it was too hot and more likely to cause serious injury than coffee served at any other establishment. McDonald's had refused several prior opportunities to settle for less than what the jury ultimately awarded. [2] The jury damages included $160,000 [ citation needed ] to cover medical expenses and compensatory damages and $2.7 million in punitive damages. The trial judge reduced the final verdict to $640,000, and the parties settled for a confidential amount before an appeal was decided. [3]

The case was said by some to be an example of frivolous litigation [4] ABC News called the case "the poster child of excessive lawsuits", [5] while the legal scholar Jonathan Turley argued that the claim was "a meaningful and worthy lawsuit". [6] Ex-attorney Susan Saladoff sees the manner in which the case was portrayed in the media as purposeful misrepresentation due to political and corporate influence. [7] In June 2011, HBO premiered Hot Coffee, a documentary that discussed in depth how the Liebeck case has centered in debates on tort reform. [8] [9] [10]


Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, [1] also known as the McDonald's coffee case and the hot coffee lawsuit, was a 1994 product liability lawsuit that became a flashpoint in the debate in the United States over tort reform. Although a New Mexico civil jury awarded $2.86 million to plaintiff Stella Liebeck, a 79-year-old woman who suffered third-degree burns in her pelvic region when she accidentally spilled hot coffee in her lap after purchasing it from a McDonald's restaurant. Ultimately, Liebeck was only awarded $640,000. Liebeck was hospitalized for eight days while she underwent skin grafting, followed by two years of medical treatment.

Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants
Full case nameStella Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, P.T.S., Inc. and McDonald's International, Inc.
DecidedAugust 18, 1994
Citation(s)1994 Extra LEXIS 23 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994), 1995 WL 360309 (Bernalillo County, N.M. Dist. Ct. 1994),
Court membership
Judge(s) sittingRobert H. Scott

Liebeck's attorneys argued that, at 180–190 °F (82–88 °C), McDonald's coffee was defective, claiming it was too hot and more likely to cause serious injury than coffee served at any other establishment. McDonald's had refused several prior opportunities to settle for less than what the jury ultimately awarded. [2] The jury damages included $160,000 [ citation needed ] to cover medical expenses and compensatory damages and $2.7 million in punitive damages. The trial judge reduced the final verdict to $640,000, and the parties settled for a confidential amount before an appeal was decided. [3]

The case was said by some to be an example of frivolous litigation [4] ABC News called the case "the poster child of excessive lawsuits", [5] while the legal scholar Jonathan Turley argued that the claim was "a meaningful and worthy lawsuit". [6] Ex-attorney Susan Saladoff sees the manner in which the case was portrayed in the media as purposeful misrepresentation due to political and corporate influence. [7] In June 2011, HBO premiered Hot Coffee, a documentary that discussed in depth how the Liebeck case has centered in debates on tort reform. [8] [9] [10]


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