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Eat Healthy by Adding a Daily Dose of Color to Your Diet

Eat Healthy by Adding a Daily Dose of Color to Your Diet


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A paint-by-numbers approach to eating healthy on a daily basis

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Sometimes things are easier to understand when they’re color-coded. Despite the vast amount of nutritional information at our fingertips, it’s easy to get confused by all of beto-and phyto-terms being thrown around. Even after a long, hard lecture from a nutritionist about how to eat right on a daily basis, you may still not fully understand how, which is why nutritionists Micheline Vargas and Keith Randolph of the Nutrilite Health Institute developed a system of colors to help one understand how to get the right amount of fruits and vegetables in their diet.

Simply put, the best way to think about eating right is by thinking about getting your daily dose of color. Vargas and Randolph categorize fruits and vegetables into five different colors: red, yellow/orange, green, blue/purple, and white, otherwise known as the "rainbow effect." For optimal health, they recommend striving for two servings of each color per day, with between 9 and 13 servings overall. By color-coordinating your servings of fruits and vegetables, you’ll not only be sure you’re getting your daily serving of fruits and vegetables, but you’ll know that you’re getting the exact amount that will promote phytonutrient protection, energy, weight control, mental health, and variety, say Vargas and Randolph. While fruits are best enjoyed raw, they suggest steaming and sautéing chopped vegetables to get the most out of your servings, because it helps to retain nutrients, and improve the texture, flavor, and color of the vegetables.

At a recent event hosted in New York City, Nutrilite and its parent-company Amway promoted eating healthy with chef Rick Bayless through three recipes that were full of all five color categories. The Swiss chard tacos provided a vegetarian and healthy variety of the Latin specialty, filled with green, white, and red vegetables, while the omelettes were enhanced with the purple vegetable eggplant. To finish up the meal, there was strong representation from most of the color categories in the dessert, which was lime ice topped with fresh berries.

Mellow Red Chile Salsa

Salsa is one of those condiments people just automatically think to buy at the store, but everyone should know that it's fairly easy — and healthier — to make your own at home.

Swiss Chard Tacos

The renowned chef known for his Mexican cooking puts a healthy spin on one of the cuisine's staples.

Racy Eggplant Omelets

The eggplant in this recipe gets its raciness from a spicy red chile salsa and some chipotle chiles en adobo — think of it as a Mexican-inspired ratatouille.

Anne Dolce is the Cook Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @anniecdolce


7 Foods High in Vitamin D to Add to Your Diet, According to Dietitians

About 40% of Americans have a vitamin D deficiency, which can impact everything from immunity to energy levels. Learn why natural sources of vitamin D are so important, then stock up on these foods high in vitamin D to get closer to your daily dose.

Vitamin D, a fat-soluble vitamin, is one of the most essential micronutrients your body needs to perform at its peak. Yet vitamin D deficiency is surprisingly common, impacting more than 40% of the U.S. population, according to research published in the journal Cereus. Here, we’re diving into why vitamin D deficiency is so common, how it impacts the body, plus how to get vitamin D (including what foods have vitamin D) so you can avoid low vitamin D levels yourself.


Eat Healthy by Adding a Daily Dose of Color to Your Diet - Recipes

Color Me Healthy — Eating for a Rainbow of Benefits
By Juliann Schaeffer
Today’s Dietitian
Vol. 10 No. 11 P. 34

Got the blues? Not your mood, your food! While you’re at it, make sure you also have reds, yellows, and other bright colors on your plate.

Beige may be a mainstay in many wardrobes because of its versatility, but when it relates to diet, simply beige is all the rage for all the wrong reasons. Americans’ affinity for all that is quick, cheap, and convenient is directing many to the cracker, cereal, and cookie aisles, leading to a high-fat and highly processed “beige diet” that is nutrient impaired.

According to Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, a lecturer in the department of food science and nutrition at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and coauthor of What Color Is Your Diet? a purely beige diet may fill Americans up now, but it could cost them later.

“We eat foods primarily based on their taste, their cost, and how convenient they are,” she notes. “The food manufacturers have done a great job of creating many foods that are easy to eat, inexpensive, and rich in sugar, fat, and salt so that they taste good. Starches, fats, and sweets are the least expensive foods in the diet, so it’s easy to see why we lean toward these ‘brown/beige’ foods. They fill us up for very little monetary cost, but there are significant health costs to a diet that is so high in refined carbohydrates and devoid of the vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals that are so abundant in plant foods.”

Americans’ fondness for foods lacking color also reflects a metaphor of what else is lacking in processed foods: phytochemicals. While some processed foods may reincorporate key nutrients during processing, “Many of the flavonoids, tannins, etc are not replaced during processing,” says Susan Kasik-Miller, MS, RD, CNSC, a clinical dietitian at Sacred Heart Hospital in Eau Claire, Wis. “The metaphor also holds for the look of our diet. Literature references bland beige swill as the only food offered to suffering people. A colorful, balanced diet is associated with good health and prosperity.”

Phytochemical-Filled Produce
So what does color have to do with diet anyway? One word: phytochemicals. These substances occur naturally only in plants and may provide health benefits beyond those that essential nutrients provide. Color, such as what makes a blueberry so blue, can indicate some of these substances, which are thought to work synergistically with vitamins, minerals, and fiber (all present in fruits and vegetables) in whole foods to promote good health and lower disease risk.

According to information from the Produce for Better Health Foundation (PBH), phytochemicals may act as antioxidants, protect and regenerate essential nutrients, and/or work to deactivate cancer-causing substances. And while research has not yet determined exactly how these substances work together or which combination offers specific benefits, including a rainbow of colored foods in a diet plan ensures a variety of those nutrients and phytochemicals.

“Plant products are sources for phytochemicals of which there are thousands that have been identified,” explains Kasik-Miller. “These chemicals are known to have disease-preventing properties, but the color of a food does not necessarily mean it contains one particular phytochemical class. Foods contain multiple phytochemicals, as well as vitamins and minerals, and it is not known how many other phytochemicals await to be identified and what functions they have with health.”

Kathy Hoy, EdD, RD, nutrition research manager for the PBH, says eating a variety of foods helps ensure the intake of an assortment of nutrients and other healthful substances in food, such as phytochemicals, noting that color can be a helpful guide for consumers. “Nutrients and phytochemicals appear to work synergistically, so maintaining a varied, colorful diet with healthful whole foods is a pragmatic approach to optimal nutrition.”

And since the average American is eating less than five servings per day of their peas, carrots, and cantaloupe, when it should be upward of seven to 13 servings for most adults, many consumers could be unknowingly missing out on a gold mine of disease prevention.1 It turns out that having clients count colors instead of calories may be an easier fix for not only weight control but overall wellness.

Counting Colors
In What Color Is Your Diet? David Heber, MD, PhD, and Bowerman attempted to group foods according to their predominant phytochemical group, coding plant foods into seven color categories: red, red/purple, orange, orange/yellow, yellow/green, green, and white/green. While research regarding color’s effect on health is ongoing and often opaque, the following is a summary of produce’s relationship with the rainbow.

Blue/Purple
Behind the color: The blue/purple hues in foods are due primarily to their anthocyanin content. Guide clients toward darker selections, as the darker the blue hue, the higher the phytochemical concentration. “In our book, we called these foods red/purple because many of the foods that are rich in anthocyanins also have a red or pink hue,” says Bowerman. Anthocyanins are antioxidants that Bowerman says are particularly heart healthy and may help support healthy blood pressure.

Gloria Tsang, RD, editor-in-chief of HealthCastle.com, says, “The anthocyanins that give these fruits their distinctive colors may help ward off heart disease by preventing clot formation. They may also help lower risk of cancer.”

And the color’s richness is actually one sign that the food is ripe and ready to eat, notes Kasik-Miller, adding that blueberries are considered to have the highest antioxidant activity of all foods.

Examples: Eggplant (especially the skin), blueberries, blackberries, prunes, plums, pomegranates

Green
Behind the color: The natural plant pigment chlorophyll colors green fruits and vegetables. “In our system, the green foods represented those foods rich in isothiocyanates, which induce enzymes in the liver that assist the body in removing potentially carcinogenic compounds,” says Bowerman. According to information from the PBH, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cabbage contain the phytochemicals indoles and isothiocyanates, which may have anticancer properties.

“Green vegetables are excellent sources of vitamin K, folic acid, potassium, as well as carotenoids and omega-3 fatty acids,” adds Kasik-Miller. “Folic acid is needed to prevent neural tube defects during pregnancy, and vitamin K is essential in blood clot formation. Diets high in potassium are associated with lowering blood pressure, and there is an inverse relationship between cruciferous vegetables and cancer, especially colon and bladder cancers.”

“In addition, sulforaphane, a phytochemical present in cruciferous vegetables, was found to detoxify cancer-causing chemicals before they do damage to the body,” says Tsang.

Examples: Broccoli, cabbage, bok choy, Brussels sprouts

Yellow/Green
Behind the color: A variation of the green color category, these foods exhibit a richness in lutein, says Bowerman. “Lutein is particularly beneficial for eye health,” she says. “There are lutein receptors in the macula of the eye, and lutein helps protect against age-related macular degeneration.” For a somewhat surprising source, have clients check out pistachio nuts—there is lutein in the green skin around the nut.

Another reason to grab some yellow/green kiwifruit at the grocery store, says Kasik-Miller, is its high amount of vitamin C.

Examples: Avocado, kiwifruit, spinach and other leafy greens, pistachios

Red
Behind the color: Lycopene is the predominant pigment in reddish fruits and veggies, according to Bowerman. A carotenoid, lycopene is a powerful antioxidant that has been associated with a reduced risk of some cancers, especially prostate cancer, and protection against heart attacks. Look for tomato-based products for the most concentrated source of this phytochemical.

“Tomatoes help support the health of prostate and breast tissue,” adds Bowerman.

And although some nutrients, such as vitamin C, are diminished with the introduction of heat, Hoy says, “The benefits of eating produce are not dependent on eating raw foods. In fact, cooking enhances the activity of some phytochemicals, such as lycopene. Obtaining optimal benefit from the nutrients in food, especially produce, depends on proper selection, storage, and cooking of the produce.”

Cooked tomato sauces are associated with greater health benefits compared with the uncooked version because the heating process allows all carotenoids, including lycopene, to be more easily absorbed by the body, according to information from the PBH.

“In addition to vitamin C and folate, red fruits and vegetables are also sources of flavonoids, which reduce inflammation and have antioxidant properties. Cranberries, another red fruit [whose color is due to anthocyanins, not lycopene], are also a good source of tannins, which prevent bacteria from attaching to cells,” says Kasik-Miller of more reasons to relish red.

Examples: Tomatoes and tomato products, watermelon, pink grapefruit, guava, cranberries

Yellow/Orange
Behind the color: “We had an orange/yellow group representing beta-cryptoxanthin and vitamin C,” says Bowerman. “Our orange group foods are also rich in beta-carotene, which are particularly good antioxidants.”

Beta-cryptoxanthin, beta-carotene, and alpha-carotene are all orange-friendly carotenoids and can be converted in the body to vitamin A, a nutrient integral for vision and immune function, as well as skin and bone health, according to information from the PBH.

“These foods are commonly considered the eyesight foods because they contain vitamin A. Beta-carotene, which can be converted into vitamin A, is a component of these foods as well. In addition, they may have high levels of vitamin C, and some contain omega-3 fatty acids,” says Kasik-Miller.

Since eyesight is dependent on the presence of vitamin A, Kasik-Miller notes that it is considered the “vision vitamin.” “Other [phyto]chemicals typically found in yellow/orange fruits and vegetables protect our eyes from cataracts and have anti-inflammatory properties. They also help with blood sugar regulation,” she adds.

Tsang notes that the beta-carotenes in some orange fruits and vegetables may also play a part in preventing cancer, particularly of the lung, esophagus, and stomach. “They may also reduce the risk of heart disease and improve immune function,” she says.

Examples: Carrots, mangos, cantaloupe, winter squash, sweet potatoes, pumpkins, apricots

No Color? No Problem
While color can give clients a general idea about what lies beneath eggplant’s exterior, a food’s hue does not tell all, and it is certainly not an exclusive indicator of phytochemical content. While some phytochemicals are pigments that give color, others are colorless.

“The largest class of phytochemicals are the flavonoids, which for the most part are colorless,” explains Bowerman. “Flavonoids are powerful antioxidants, and these help the body to counteract free-radical formation. When free-radical damage goes unchecked, it can cause significant damage to body cells and tissues.”

There are more than 4,000 different flavonoids, and according to information from the PBH, they are classified into the following categories:

• flavonols:
-myricetin (in berries, grapes, parsley, and spinach)
-quercetin (in onions, apples, broccoli, cranberries, and grapes)

• flavones:
-apigenin (in celery, lettuce, and parsley)
-luteolin (in beets, bell peppers, and Brussels sprouts)

• flavanones:
-hesperetin and naringenin (both in citrus fruits and juices)

• flavan-3-ols:
-catechin (in tea, red wine, and dark chocolate)
-epicatechin, gallate, epigallocatechin, and epigallocatechin gallate (in teas, fruits, and legumes) and

• anthocyanidins (in blue/purple and red fruits and vegetables).

Although not enough research has been conducted to definitively match specific phytochemicals with particular benefits, researchers are currently investigating flavonoids’ effect on lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease and several types of cancer and their role in promoting lung health and protecting against asthma.

Eat Your Colors
The concept of suggesting that clients eat a certain color ratio of foods may be premature, but Hoy says the take-away message is that including a variety of colors in one’s diet seems to equal better overall health, especially in relation to produce. “Epidemiological research suggests that food patterns that include fruits and vegetables are associated with lower risk for some diseases, and a recent article suggested that more variety in fruit and vegetable intake was associated with a lower risk for pharyngeal and laryngeal cancers, suggesting that variety may also be another important factor to consider. However, it is not known if there is an optimal ratio of colors to be consumed or what that is,” says Hoy.2,3

Kasik-Miller agrees: “At this time, scientists are not sure what proportion of phytochemicals is the right balance for disease prevention. There have been studies where specific antioxidants were given and there was an increase in the disease rate. To make recommendations to eat a specific number of servings of beets or blueberries is premature eat what looks good and you can afford. Foods of the same color do not necessarily contain the same vitamins, minerals, or phytochemicals, so recommendations to eat specific amounts of colored foods is impossible.”

And considering that the majority of individuals are not meeting current recommendations for fruit and vegetable intake, encouraging consumers to use color as a guide for increasing produce consumption is a good strategy, Hoy says.1

What’s the best way to convey this message to clients? Instead of delving into a complex and complicated conversation about phytochemicals, Molly Morgan, RD, CDN, owner of Creative Nutrition Solutions, says the more matters idea can easily be tweaked to more color matters. “I believe consumers can do better by consciously trying to include many different colors in their eating plan rather than getting stuck on what colors do what. Each color provides various health benefits and no one color is superior to another, which is why I believe a balance of all colors is most important,” she says.

“I think the color approach that we used in What Color Is Your Diet? resonated well with people because intuitively they knew that colors equal health and that the more colors that were eaten, the better it probably was to overall health,” says Bowerman of getting this message out to the masses. “Educating people as to the health benefits is a start, but they also have to be willing to try new foods or new varieties of foods—or maybe to prepare unfamiliar foods in a way that will make them taste good—so that they will be willing to add more plant foods to their diet.”

Once people are aware of this dietary color concept, Hoy says creativity can go a long way. “Creatively including fruits and vegetables at meals will help them to include a wide range of different foods. In addition to simple things like adding fruits or vegetables to casseroles, cereal, or sandwiches, being open to trying new foods, recipes, or meal patterns will help to increase variety,” she says. “Other ways to increase variety would include making fruits and vegetables more center of the plate when planning meals, including a fruit and/or vegetable at every eating occasion, adding an extra fruit and/or vegetable side dish to meals, and substituting fruits, vegetables, and beans for other ingredients such as meat in recipes.”

Planning ahead is Morgan’s mantra, and she recommends challenging clients to take notice of color when grocery shopping. She says to tell clients, “Challenge yourself to look at your cart when leaving the produce section, and if you have all red items, head back and swap something out for another color. For example, if you had strawberries, watermelon, and tomatoes, swap the strawberries for some oranges.”

And since winter is fast approaching and the season is swinging away from some of the colorful foods familiar to consumers, such as blueberries and strawberries, Kasik-Miller says a trip to the farmers’ market may be warranted. “Also, people need to get into the habit of cooking at home,” she says. “If you are not sure about what to do with a colorful food or are looking for a new way to eat it, go to the grower’s association Web site to get recipes and new ways to eat foods. I think people need to be more creative with how they prepare foods. People know they need lots of color in their diet but find it hard to change food habits. They need to make small changes over a period of time to achieve success.”
While there may not be much to compare between dinner and Dior, it seems this much is true: There appears to be more reason to eat the spectrum of colors than to wear them.


2. Whole Grains

Whole grains like brown rice, whole wheat bread, popcorn, and oatmeal are chock-full of antioxidants, phytic acid, vitamin E, and selenium𠅊ll of which may help lower inflammation. Whole grains also usually contain fiber, and some research suggests that higher fiber diets could help fight inflammation. Women, aim to eat 25 grams of fiber each day men, shoot for 38 grams. If you&aposve been falling short of those fiber goals, start adding whole grain recipes to your meal plan.


What Should Your Diet Be Like After 50?

En español | It was 1941. The National Academy of Sciences, tasked with helping out World War II food-relief efforts, issued a report that addressed this question: What nutrients, and in what amounts, do people need to be healthy?

The government's food experts weren't thinking about long-term health issues such as diabetes or heart disease. They were more concerned about an adequately fed population that was free from scurvy, rickets and other wartime diseases of malnutrition. And the numbers they landed on for protein, calories, six vitamins and two minerals were dubbed the recommended dietary allowances (RDAs). It may surprise you to learn that the RDAs are still driving dietary advice today. They underpin every nutritional label on every package in your pantry, and they're used to establish eating plans for everyone from schoolchildren to nursing home residents. And while, yes, the guidelines for preventing nutritional deficiencies and promoting health have been adjusted over the decades, they're still building toward long-term health goals like preventing chronic disease.

"We know that certain nutrients are better in higher amounts,” says Katherine Tucker, director of the Center for Population Health at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. “It's not just about preventing deficiency diseases. It's about keeping our systems optimal as we age."

Although the past six months have sure had echoes of wartime deprivation — with depleted grocery shelves for certain items — Americans haven't been at any real risk of developing scurvy. With fall harvest season ahead, it's a good time to reassess what your body needs now, for maximum health in this decade and the decades to come.

To head off diabetes: Optimize your hormone balance

Insulin is critical to healthy aging. It's the hormone that moves sugar from your bloodstream into your muscle, fat and liver cells. But when your blood sugar is consistently high — which is often the result of a sweet and refined-carbohydrate diet — your muscle, fat and liver cells stop responding well to insulin. Doctors call this insulin resistance, and it explains why about 1 in 10 American adults have type 2 diabetes.

One medium pear packs about 5 grams of fiber.

While losing weight is crucial to keeping your insulin responsive, so too is minimizing blood-sugar spikes. In addition to avoiding sweet and refined-carbohydrate foods, the way to stabilize blood sugar is by adding more fiber to your diet. One type of fiber to be aware of is insoluble fiber. It's the nondigestible kind you might have referred to it as roughage. It passes through the upper gut undigested, to feed the good bacteria in the lower intestines. “These bacteria are little factories that produce chemicals that affect our hormone balance,” Tucker explains. The combo of roughage and good bacteria offers a double hit of diabetes protection: The roughage slows digestion (and blood sugar), while the bacteria help to improve your insulin sensitivity.

How much fiber is enough? The RDAs advise that women over 50 eat 21 grams a day for men, the goal is 30 grams. And this is a case where the specific targets matter: National consumption surveys indicate that only about 5 percent of people consume their daily fiber quota, yet doing so can reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by as much as 20 to 30 percent, according to a study published in the Journal of Nutrition. “Almost no adult eats enough fiber,” says Kathleen Niedert, a health care administrator, registered dietitian and author of Nutrition Care of the Older Adult. “And it's difficult to get what you need unless you start your day with bran cereal.”

To her point, 1/4 cup of bran delivers 6 grams of insoluble fiber — that's about 25 percent of your entire day's needs. Try sprinkling it over oatmeal or blending it into smoothies or casseroles. Generally speaking, fruits and vegetables are good sources of fiber, too. But to max your intake of the insoluble stuff, replace your refined grains and white bread with whole-grain everything. A cup of cooked white rice has about 0.6 grams of fiber brown rice, however, has 3.5 grams, while barley delivers about 6 grams of mostly insoluble fiber.

To stop muscle loss: Have one or more protein sources every meal

Age-related muscle deterioration kicks into high gear around age 50, notes Rosilene Ribeiro, a nutritional epidemiologist at the University of Sydney. Even if you're not an aspiring bodybuilder, that's a problem. “Muscle mass is linked with everyday functionality,” Ribeiro says. “It affects normal things like gardening and walking long distances.”

Worse, muscle loss can be hard to notice. In a study of nearly 1,900 older adults, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh determined that you're losing strength about three times faster than muscle mass. So, though your biceps might stay the same size, the quality of the muscle is withering. If you don't eat for strength now, you might one day struggle to mow your own lawn or lift a bag of potting soil. “When you can no longer do things you once could, it creates a snowball effect,” Ribeiro observes.


Diabetic Heart Healthy Meals

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Use the diabetes food hub to get some ideas for healthy foods you can cook at home.

How to eat less saturated fat. In an ideal world, processed food wouldn't be so readily available, since it contributes to obesity and, in turn, diabetes and heart disease. And that means you should choose a healthy diet. At lunch and dinner, fill half of your plate with nonstarchy vegetables. Make only one main dish and supplement with frozen vegetables and bagged salads. Add an array of colors to your plate and think of it as eating the rainbow. Use the diabetes food hub to get some ideas for healthy foods you can cook at home. We all know that fresh, whole foods support a healthy heart, but what should diabetics focus on? Try to include at least 1 starchy food with each main meal. Learn the top nutrients that keep your heart beating at its best, along with menu suggestions to make these foods part of your daily meals. Oily fish like mackerel, salmon and sardines we don't recommend 'diabetic' ice cream or sweets. Mix it up with different flavors of hummus and different types of vegetables depending on your mood. Meals that help control high blood pressure and diabetes.

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For babies, a healthy diet means exclusive breastfeeding in the first six months, with the introduction of nutritious and safe foods to complement breastmilk from age 6 months to 2 years and beyond.

For babies, a healthy diet means exclusive breastfeeding in the first six months, with the introduction of nutritious and safe foods to complement breastmilk from age 6 months to 2 years and beyond. As you work with your doctor and/or nutritionist to create a heart healthy diet plan, you'll learn ways to stick to the plan and create delicious meals you and your family can enjoy. It's now against the law to label any food as diabetic and there's no evidence to suggest that. How can you improve your heart health with food? You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and what does a diabetes diet involve? Mix it up with different flavors of hummus and different types of vegetables depending on your mood. Use the diabetes food hub to get some ideas for healthy foods you can cook at home. Yes, the latest comprehensive research on diabetic eating has found that certain complex carbohydrates such as rye and barley actually are. Diabetic & heart healthy meals. An eating plan that helps manage your weight includes a variety of healthy foods. 9 fruits you should be eating and 8 you shouldn't if you are diabetic. And there is one food that provides an abundance of benefits. Diabetic cookbook and meal plan for the newly diagnosed:

For young children, a healthy and balanced diet is essential for growth and development. Try to include at least 1 starchy food with each main meal. 9 fruits you should be eating and 8 you shouldn't if you are diabetic. Curcumin, the active ingredient, can lower inflammation and blood sugar levels. How can you improve your heart health with food?

Diabetic Recipes 300 Indian Diabetic Recipes Tarladalal Com from www.tarladalal.com And that means you should choose a healthy diet. The delectable recipes in diabetes & heart healthy meals for two will keep you healthfully fed with very little prep time. Good foods for diabetics chia best diet for diabetics turmeric is a spice with strong health benefits. We all know that fresh, whole foods support a healthy heart, but what should diabetics focus on? Yes, the latest comprehensive research on diabetic eating has found that certain complex carbohydrates such as rye diabetic & heart healthy meals. Yes, the latest comprehensive research on diabetic eating has found that certain complex carbohydrates such as rye and barley actually are. Diabetic & heart healthy meals. As you work with your doctor and/or nutritionist to create a heart healthy diet plan, you'll learn ways to stick to the plan and create delicious meals you and your family can enjoy.

Yes, the latest comprehensive research on diabetic eating has found that certain complex carbohydrates such as rye diabetic & heart healthy meals.

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Nutrition also plays a key role in keeping your. Curcumin, the active ingredient, can lower inflammation and blood sugar levels. Diabetic and healthy heart recipes. We all know that fresh, whole foods support a healthy heart, but what should diabetics focus on? It's now against the law to label any food as diabetic and there's no evidence to suggest that.

Source: www.diabetesfoodhub.org

The american heart association's mission is to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Mix it up with different flavors of hummus and different types of vegetables depending on your mood. In an ideal world, processed food wouldn't be so readily available, since it contributes to obesity and, in turn, diabetes and heart disease. With over 170 recipes, there are plenty of options to keep your heart at its healthiest and your blood glucose under control. To keep it running in top form you need to give it heart healthy fuel.

For babies, a healthy diet means exclusive breastfeeding in the first six months, with the introduction of nutritious and safe foods to complement breastmilk from age 6 months to 2 years and beyond. What's that, you might ask, carbs for diabetics? Your heart is a finely tuned machine. Curcumin, the active ingredient, can lower inflammation and blood sugar levels. At lunch and dinner, fill half of your plate with nonstarchy vegetables.

The delectable recipes in diabetes & heart healthy meals for two will keep you healthfully fed with very little prep time. On average, our hearts beat over two billion times throughout the course of our lives, pumping blood to the rest of our body. Good foods for diabetics chia best diet for diabetics turmeric is a spice with strong health benefits. Heart and diabetes healthy meals : For babies, a healthy diet means exclusive breastfeeding in the first six months, with the introduction of nutritious and safe foods to complement breastmilk from age 6 months to 2 years and beyond.

The centers for disease control and prevention (cdc) warn that eating foods high in fat, cholesterol , or sodium can be very bad for the heart. And there is one food when you set out to eat a heart healthy meal that's equally diabetic friendly, your plate should be loaded disclaimer: It's now against the law to label any food as diabetic and there's no evidence to suggest that. Work these heart healthy foods to into your cardiac diet plan to ward off high cholesterol & heart disease. The american heart association's mission is to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke.

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Good foods for diabetics chia best diet for diabetics turmeric is a spice with strong health benefits. Eat your way to a healthy heart this month! And there is one food when you set out to eat a heart healthy meal that's equally diabetic friendly, your plate should be loaded disclaimer: When you set out to eat a heart healthy meal that's equally diabetic friendly, your plate should be loaded up with a pile of vegetables. How to eat less saturated fat.

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What's that, you might ask, carbs for diabetics? In an ideal world, processed food wouldn't be so readily available, since it contributes to obesity and, in turn, diabetes and heart disease. To keep it running in top form you need to give it heart healthy fuel. Mix it up with different flavors of hummus and different types of vegetables depending on your mood. The delectable recipes in diabetes & heart healthy meals for two will keep you healthfully fed with very little prep time.

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When you set out to eat a heart healthy meal that's equally diabetic friendly, your plate should be loaded up with a pile of vegetables. With over 170 recipes, there are plenty of options to keep your heart at its healthiest and your blood glucose under control. As you work with your doctor and/or nutritionist to create a heart healthy diet plan, you'll learn ways to stick to the plan and create delicious meals you and your family can enjoy. Eating a heart healthy diet happens to be great for diabetic management too. Learn what a healthy eating plan includes and how to create a balanced diet with foods you enjoy.

Diabetic & heart healthy meals. Work these heart healthy foods to into your cardiac diet plan to ward off high cholesterol & heart disease. Eat your way to a healthy heart this month! 9 fruits you should be eating and 8 you shouldn't if you are diabetic. Mix it up with different flavors of hummus and different types of vegetables depending on your mood.

Curcumin, the active ingredient, can lower inflammation and blood sugar levels.

Learn what a healthy eating plan includes and how to create a balanced diet with foods you enjoy.

Diabetic & heart healthy meals.

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Work these heart healthy foods to into your cardiac diet plan to ward off high cholesterol & heart disease.

Your heart is a finely tuned machine.

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Diabetic cookbook and meal plan for the newly diagnosed:

How can you improve your heart health with food?

We all know that fresh, whole foods support a healthy heart, but what should diabetics focus on?

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Try out these tips for healthy eating.

Add an array of colors to your plate and think of it as eating the rainbow.

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Try out these tips for healthy eating.

Try to include at least 1 starchy food with each main meal.

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The centers for disease control and prevention (cdc) warn that eating foods high in fat, cholesterol , or sodium can be very bad for the heart.

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And there is one food that provides an abundance of benefits.

Make only one main dish and supplement with frozen vegetables and bagged salads.

As you work with your doctor and/or nutritionist to create a heart healthy diet plan, you'll learn ways to stick to the plan and create delicious meals you and your family can enjoy.

For young children, a healthy and balanced diet is essential for growth and development.

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With over 170 recipes, there are plenty of options to keep your heart at its healthiest and your blood glucose under control.

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Yes, the latest comprehensive research on diabetic eating has found that certain complex carbohydrates such as rye diabetic & heart healthy meals.

Heart and diabetes healthy meals :

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Eat your way to a healthy heart this month!

At lunch and dinner, fill half of your plate with nonstarchy vegetables.

Make only one main dish and supplement with frozen vegetables and bagged salads.

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Diabetic and healthy heart recipes.

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5. Blackberries (2 grams protein)

Surprisingly, one cup of raw blackberries contains about two grams of protein (and a whopping eight grams of fiber). You&rsquoll also find nearly 50 percent of the recommended daily allowance of vitamin C, plus high levels of free-radical-fighting antioxidants and brain-boosting polyphenols.

Protein-rich snack pairing: A half-cup of Greek yogurt


Kripalu Recipe: Ginger-Turmeric Lassi

This is an excellent Ayurvedic tonic after the midday meal, settling the stomach and increasing the digestion and absorption of nutrients.

Go ahead, jump on the turmeric train! If you've been wondering how to take turmeric, here are 10 creative ways to incorporate turmeric into your daily diet.

Golden milk. Bring to a boil 2 cups of milk or unsweetened almond milk with 1 teaspoon powdered turmeric and 1 teaspoon powdered ginger. Turn off heat, let cool for a few minutes, and add 1 tablespoon of raw honey. If you’re drinking it before bed, add ½ teaspoon each of nutmeg, cinnamon, and cardamom to the mixture to promote a good night’s sleep. Optional: Add 2 teaspoons of ghee or good-quality coconut oil.

Cold buster. Mix one part powdered turmeric to three parts raw honey. When you feel a cold coming on, eat a teaspoon of the mixture every two hours to boost immunity and lower inflammation.

Soup it up. Add a tablespoon of powdered turmeric to your vegetable soup along with lots of fresh oregano, to kill any infections or viruses that may be hanging on in your body.

Mellow yellow. Sprinkle turmeric into your scrambled eggs. The taste is mild and the eggs are already yellow, so it will go undetected if you are trying to get kids to eat it.

Cashew Banana Turmeric Muffins

1 cup chopped cashews
3 mashed ripe bananas
¼ cup melted coconut oil
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon each cinnamon, turmeric, nutmeg, cardamom, cloves, and salt

Mix dry ingredients and wet ingredients in separate bowls. Slowly mix wet ingredients into dry, and pour into lined muffin tins. Bake at 350 degrees for approximately 25 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean.


Add three dates to a daily diet and these 5 things will happen!

1. Improve Digestive Health

Dates contain a bunch of soluble fibers. Soluble fiber is essential for good digestive health because it draws water into the digestive tract. This helps relieve constipation. The potassium found in dates can also treat upset stomachs and diarrhea. They are a digestive tract balancer that is symbolized by their brown color (brown foods are always great for digestion). And they also strengthen good bacteria in the stomach!

2. Treat and Prevent Anemia

Anemia is a common issue among most people. I have been anemic from time to time. Dates are an excellent source of iron, so they help treat iron-deficient anemia. Anemia can leave one feeling exhausted. Boost iron levels with this delicious fruit!

3. Bone, Blood and Immune System Health

Dates contain magnesium, manganese, and selenium. Diets rich in selenium are known to prevent cancer. These minerals are also necessary for keeping our bones and blood strong and healthy. Therefore, keep bones strong by adding a date or two to your diet. They taste great!

4. Energy Boost

Dates are filled with natural sugars. These natural sweeteners include fructose, sucrose, and glucose. This makes them a perfect afternoon snack if you need a quick energy boost. Skip the energy bar and eat a couple of dates instead. The fiber in these tasty treats keeps power up without the crash one would typically experience from any other sweet treat.

5. Heart Health

The potassium found in this small fruit package reduces stroke risk, and adding dates to your diet can lower LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol.

“If you have heart disease or you just want to keep your ticker healthy, you’ve probably heard the mantra already: “Watch your cholesterol!” The type that puts your heart at risk is LDL — the “bad” cholesterol.
It collects on the walls of your blood vessels, where it can cause blockages. Higher LDL levels put you at greater risk for a heart attack from a sudden blood clot that forms there.” (WebMD)

Consuming dates can lower this bad cholesterol and keep the heart safe!

Adding dates to one’s diet is an excellent way to obtain a whole bunch of health benefits with only a handful of sweetness.

“Ultimately, dates are good for overall health despite their fructose concentration. Even if your diet is a sugar-free one, devoid of high-fructose corn syrup, agave, honey, coconut sugar, and cane sugar, you probably still eat fruit, and dates are a fruit too, with loads of benefits. When picking out your dates, look for plump ones with unbroken, smoothly wrinkled skins, and avoid those that smell rancid or are hardened. Dried dates keep for up to a year in the refrigerator while fresh dates should be refrigerated in tight, sealed containers and can keep for up to eight months.” (One Green Planet)

You can learn more about the health benefits of dates in the video below!


Eat 1/2 Teaspoon of Turmeric Daily and THIS Will Happen to Your Brain and Liver!

If you’re like me, you’re always looking for ways to better your health. From new dinner recipes to nutritious smoothie concoctions, I’m constantly searching for ways to keep a healthy diet from getting boring. If you’re looking for a way to spice things up (literally) while reaping the healthy benefits, it’s time to start incorporating a little turmeric into your diet!

If turmeric is new to you, it comes from the root of the Curcuma longa plant. It has tough brown skin and a deep orange flesh, with a bitter but warm and peppery flavor. Turmeric ( click here for International products ) is known as one of the ingredients in curry, and it’s been used for centuries as a powerful anti-inflammatory in both Indian and Chinese medicine to treat a wide variety of illnesses, including liver disease.

Turmeric for Liver Function

Your liver holds the important responsibilities of converting food to energy for your body, cleaning toxins from your blood, and producing bile to aid in digestion. Studies suggest that turmeric may improve liver function by increasing its ability to detox. Turmeric has also been shown to help reduce free radical damage, protecting your cells and tissues. One of the active ingredients in turmeric is curcumin — a powerful anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, antifungal and antibacterial… basically anti-everything bad and pro-everything good! Turmeric has also been shown to reduce liver injury caused by ethanol (alcohol), iron overdose, liver disease, high toxicity levels and cirrhosis. It is also proven to help relieve oxidative stress, due to its healing properties.

Turmeric for Brain Health

Researchers have found that curcumin plays a role in improving Parkinson’s Disease, Alzheimer’s, and stroke damage. Thanks to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, it also promotes brain health. Studies have shown that curcumin may alleviate the effects of glutathione depletion, which causes oxidative stress, mitochondria dysfunction and even cell death. Recent research suggests that another bioactive compound in turmeric (aromatic-tumerone) can increase neural stem cell growth in the brain by as much as 80%, aiding in the recovery of brain function and neurodegenerative diseases.

As if you needed more information supporting turmeric’s potential to support brain health, research has shown that it may also help protect against depression. The curcumin acts against oxidative and inflammatory responses that are generated during depression while repairing the damage done by free radicals.

Just 1/4 teaspoon of turmeric ( click here for International products ) a day can reduce any inflammation in your body and help protect against diseases while improving your brain function. So, how can you be sure that you’re getting a daily dose of this powerful spice? The good news is that you have plenty of options. Turmeric can be taken in pill form as a supplement you can use the root to make tea you can use turmeric oil in your cooking, and the list goes on. Here are a few ways to use turmeric on a daily basis:


Things To Remember

You may try various recipes and combination of ingredients for the good of your baby. But you cannot force-feed them just because it is good for their health. Here are a few things to remember and dos and don’ts to follow:

1. Make food fun

It is now time to bring out your creativity with your toddler’s meal. Try pretending cauliflower or broccoli as trees on a mashed-potato island. Try cutting sandwiches, idlis, and more with cookie cutters to get them into the shapes of stars, animals, and more. Your little one would surely enjoy eating.

2. Eating habits change

Do not worry even if your toddler is a fussy eater. Their eating habits may change due to the change in the growth pattern. The food they loved last month may not remain the same now.
The toddler’s appetite may slow down in the second year, unlike the first year. Your baby must have tripled their birth weight in the first year, but the weight gain might slow down in the second year with an expected weight gain of just around 2.4kg.

3. Exploration time

It is time your little one is busy exploring the world and may not bother much about food. Also, their appetite is still not big enough to have one big meal. Be prepared for smaller meals several times all through the day.

4. No force, please

Remember, your toddler will eat when they are hungry. Do not force them to finish the plate or judge your little one by the quantity they are eating. Instead, check for their energy levels, physical as well as mental growth.

5. Allow self-feeding

Your toddler still needs your help while feeding but allow them to feed themselves if they want to. Do not worry if they get messy. A 15-month toddler will be able to hold and drink from a cup with a little assistance from an adult. They would show interest in eating with a spoon.

Your 15-month-old can eat the same food prepared for the rest of the family. But it should be low on salt and spices. Chop the food into toddler-friendly pieces. Whenever possible, try to eat together as a family and boost up your bonding!

How do you make food interesting for your toddler? Let us know in the comments section below.



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